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Must give emergency officials routing and volume information
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Americans United For Separation of Church and State says so
Cites U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 United Citizens decision
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Updating 20 year old one that leaves issues taking over FWP
Litigation over satellite ones in Montana pushed issue forward
State snowpack is less than half of average and most is gone
VA doctors could discuss medical marijuana with their patients
Commissioner of Political Practices says no legal issues raised
60 in Mt & other western states will help stretch H2O supplies
Mt is one of 47 states, along with Dist. of Columbia, to have one
Wyo. Gov. Mead visted Oregon Gov. Brown to ease concerns
One of the nation's best  in getting welfare kids in good home
Trying to keep Greater Sage Grouse safe during wildfire season
Montana ranks lowest in the nation in % of change in tuition
Mountain snowpack below normal but precip. may have helped
$1.4 million for legislative interim committees til 2017
Criminal misconduct must be proved before forfeiture
Still doesn't change tide of Syria and Middle East though
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HELENA  U.S. Rep. Steve Daines, R-Mont., isn’t impressed with
President Barack Obama’s proposed 2015 federal budget, saying it increases “wasteful Washington spending” – but he’s not the only member of Montana’s congressional delegation blasting the budget.

Newly appointed Democratic U.S. Sen. John Walsh also criticized the president’s proposal, saying it is “littered with missed opportunities that fail to cut waste,” and that it “falls short of meeting Montana’s needs.”

“This is a disappointing framework, and I will work to ensure that the appropriations bills better reflect Montana’s priorities,” he said in a statement late Tuesday.

Daines is running this year for Walsh’s Senate seat. If the two men win their respective U.S. Senate primary elections in June, they will face off this fall in the general election.

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., was a bit more positive about the president’s budget, as he applauded Obama’s proposals for new spending on early childhood education, infrastructure and research and development.

Still, even Tester said the president’s plan doesn’t go far enough to reduce the federal deficit.

“We need to do more to get our fiscal house in order as we strengthen our economy,” said Tester, who has pushed for a broader tax-and-spending package that would lower federal deficits over the long term.

Obama released his proposed federal budget Tuesday for fiscal year 2015, which begins in October.

The $3.9 trillion budget includes new spending on defense, early childhood education, roads and bridges and expanded income-tax credits for the poor. He would pay for the new spending primarily with higher taxes on the wealthy and large businesses.

Late last year, Congress agreed to spending limits for the overall budget through 2015. Obama’s budget proposal fills in the details, outlining dozens of spending priorities for Congress to consider, as well as the new spending above the agreed-upon limit.

Leaders of the Republican majority in the U.S. House dismissed the Obama budget as a political document meant to fire up Democratic voters, with most of its proposals having little chance of passing.

Daines, who voted against the overall spending limits as too high, echoed that sentiment Wednesday, saying Obama’s proposal is not a “serious budget that addresses the problems facing our nation and tackles our debt.”

Obama should have put forth real reforms that move the federal budget toward balancing, rather than just continuing long-term deficit spending, he said. The budget has a projected $564 billion deficit next year, down from this year’s deficit of $649 billion.

Walsh, appointed Feb. 7 as Montana’s newest U.S. senator, criticized the president’s budget on several fronts.

He said it maintains “excessive private (military) contracts” while reducing benefits for military personnel, cuts support for rural hospitals and the Farm Service Agency offices, and prevent Montana schools for getting a technology grant to improve Internet access.

However, he did say he likes its general support of rural broadband development, the funding for universal preschool, full funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and establishment of a separate fund for firefighting costs on public and neighboring wildlands.

 

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